Mihevc vs. Matlow; called out for campaigning on city property; teepees at Nathan Phillips Square; we asked every mayoral, city councillor, and public school board trustee candidate some questions

4:22 p.m. Oct. 9, 2018. A teepee sits above a platform on the roof of Toronto City Hall on Tuesday, the first day of the three-day Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration in Toronto.
4:22 p.m. Oct. 9, 2018. A teepee sits above a platform on the roof of Toronto City Hall on Tuesday, the first day of the three-day Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration in Toronto.

Mihevc vs. Matlow John Tory (incumbent mayoral candidate) endorsed Joe Mihevc (incumbent councillor for part of new ward) in Toronto-St. Paul’s on Friday with an automated voicemail message (listen here), in the highly competitive race between Mihevc and Josh Matlow (incumbent councillor for the other part of new ward). The race is expected to be close; in the 2014 election Mihevc earned 15,745 votes, which was 86 per cent of the total voter turnout for his ward. Matlow earned 24,347 votes, which was 77 per cent of the total voter turnout for his ward. The two politicians differ in their public communication styles at committees and in council chambers. Mihevc is older, seasoned, and brings an even-tempered diplomatic nature that Tory prizes. Matlow is younger, fiery, and not afraid to be contrarian. 

Other candidate endorsements. On Friday morning at Main Street TTC station, Tory held a news conference with Beaches–East York candidate Brad Bradford and with Eglinton–Lawrence MP Marco Mendicino. This is the second time Tory has stood with Bradford before media, to support the candidate in one of the city’s two-councillor races that has no incumbent. Janet Davis, councillor for the former local ward, was also campaigning at the station to support Matthew Kellway. Davis, no stranger to reminding Tory of the rules, went right up to the mayor to tell him he should not be campaigning on TTC property. Tory and his team obliged. (Read the story.) On Saturday and Sunday, Spadina–Fort York councillor candidate Joe Cressy endorsed mayoral candidate Jennifer Keesmaat at an announcement and Keesmaat said she’s looking forward to working with him in her first 100 days in office as mayor should she be elected. On Sunday, University–Rosedale candidate Mike Layton also endorsed Keesmaat at a town hall he hosted. A Forum Research poll this week puts Tory ahead of Keesmaat, with his approval remaining steady.

Mayoral debates. The Globe and Mail held its mayoral debate this past week featuring John Tory, Jennifer Keesmaat, Saron Gebresellassi, and Sarah Climenhaga – as well as five audience disruptors. The hour-and-a-half show is available to stream on YouTube, and as of time of publication had over 7,000 views. The format involved questions for particular candidates followed by two minutes of open debate on the topic, and an oxford style section where candidates were asked to speak in favour of or against a statement (not about their opponents). The open debate on each topic showed where each candidate was strong, and the areas where they had nothing to say.

Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration at city hall. After opposing an idea for a march, and proposing an original plan through city council’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee, a three-day event came together called the Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration produced by the Toronto Council Fire Native Cultural Centre in collaboration with the City of Toronto. The event involved teepees in front of city hall and one on the roof (pictured above), workshops, and performances. “This gathering is significant as it is scheduled around the new lunar moon cycle, which represents a positive energy force in addition to our harvest cycle, a time to acknowledge and give thanks for all that we are provided and a part of,” read a statement quoting Andrea Chrisjohn, Board Designate (ohkwali clan, On^yota’a:ka), Toronto Council Fire Native Cultural Centre. “And, to celebrate the resiliency, change and growth of our people.”

In other news… Oct 12, 2018, on TVO.org by Steve Paikin, Jennifer Keesmaat may not become mayor of Toronto — but her political future looks brightOctober 12, 2018, in the National Post by Joseph Brean, Bell believed it would suffer ‘commercial harm’ by running far-right Toronto candidate’s election ad: documentsWed., Oct. 10, 2018, in The Toronto Star  by the Star Editorial Board, Sidewalk Labs community can’t be just a techno-experiment.

The week ahead. There will be a mayoral debate about affordable housing and homelessness on Monday night at OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education) Auditorium (252 Bloor St. West), University of Toronto.  Doors open at 6 p.m. Debate starts at 7 p.m.

 

(Updated 10:12 p.m. Oct. 14, 2018. Please note, an earlier version of this Newsbrief incorrectly stated the number of votes for Matlow and Mihevc. It has been corrected.)

4:21 p.m. Oct. 9, 2018. A teepee sits above a platform on the roof of Toronto City Hall on Tuesday, the first day of the three-day Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration in Toronto.
4:21 p.m. Oct. 9, 2018. A teepee sits above a platform on the roof of Toronto City Hall on Tuesday, the first day of the three-day Indian Residential School Survivors (IRSS) Legacy Celebration in Toronto.

Toronto election candidate profiles

We asked every mayoral, city councillor, and public school board trustee candidate to tell us briefly why they’re running, what they did before running, what they think is the most important election issue, what accomplishment they are most proud of in the last five years, why voters should give them a chance, and finally – what their theme song would be for their campaign.

Launching on signaltoronto.com early this week!

Note to candidates: We reached out to every contact on the City’s election website with the questionnaire. If you would like to have your response included in the candidate listings, please email election@signaltoronto.com for instructions, including word-count requirements. Candidate profiles will be published as they are received (subject to editing).


 

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This Newsbrief is by Arianne Robinson.