Election results; council races end with same percentage of women; why the future may not be female in Toronto

12:31 p.m. Oct. 28, 2018. Mayor John Tory speaks to media alongside Ana Bailão, re-elected councillor for Davenport. Bailão was one of three symbolic deputy mayors last term.
12:31 p.m. Oct. 28, 2018. Mayor John Tory speaks to media alongside Ana Bailão, re-elected councillor for Davenport. Bailão was one of three symbolic deputy mayors last term.

Weekend Newsbrief: October 28, 2018

What happened at Toronto City Hall this week

Municipal election results. Mayor John Tory was elected to a second term on Monday night. “Together I think we can get things built. We can tear down barriers. We can make sure the city reaches its full potential. At its core, that means opportunity for everyone, without exception. It means that that opportunity must be closer than it has ever been before for everyone without exception,” Tory told supporters in his victory speech. (Read the story) Of the 698,741 people who voted for the top four candidates, Tory received 479,659 votes,  former chief planner Jennifer Keesmaat received 178,193, Faith Goldy received 25,667, and Saron Gebresellassi received 15,222.

Toronto council races end with same percentage of women on council (and that’s only half the number of men). Toronto’s new smaller city council will have the same percentage of women as last term, which is still only half the number of men representing residents of Toronto. Out of the four non-incumbent councillors that were elected on Monday, two are women. At the end of the 2018 term, 14 out of 44 councillors were women (31.8 per cent). After Monday’s vote, women make up eight of 25 members of city council (32 per cent). On the city’s east side in Scarborough North, Cynthia Lai won in the open race. Jennifer McKelvie defeated Neethan Shan who was elected in Scarborough Rouge-Park in a by-election in February 2017 after Raymond Cho left to run as an MPP with the Progressive Conservative party. The two other non-incumbent councillors are Brad Bradford in Beaches-East York, who was endorsed by mayor-elect John Tory, and Mike Colle in Eglinton-Lawrence, a former MPP and father of Josh Colle, who was TTC Chair and councillor for part of the new ward in the last term. (Read the story)

Why the future may not be female in Toronto. Only moments after Mayor John Tory won his second election, the incumbent mayor announced he is thinking about his own future at city hall and would consider running for a third term depending on how the second one goes. Asked what has changed his mind, Tory said, “I haven’t changed my mind but I’ve left it open that I could change my mind later… if I have the sense there are people that want to take [transit and affordable housing plans] backward.”

9:04 p.m. Oct. 22, 2018. Mayor John Tory and wife Barbara Hackett on election night, as they move from the stage to the exit at Tory’s victory party.
9:04 p.m. Oct. 22, 2018. Mayor John Tory and wife Barbara Hackett on election night, as they move from the stage to the exit at Tory’s victory party.

In other news (and analysis)
– Oct. 23, 2018. Steve Paikin interviews Jon Thompson, Mary Baxter, Claude Sharma, and David Rockne Corrigan on The Agenda, TVO (video): Ontario Hubs: Municipal Election Debrief
– Oct. 23, 2018. Jake Edmiston in the National Post (print): Ontario municipal elections roundup: Upsets, comebacks and malfunctions
– Oct 26, 2018. John Michael McGrath on TVO (online): Toronto’s new, smaller council is here. How is it supposed to govern? OPINION: The city’s new 25-ward council has to figure out how to run things now that Queen’s Park has punched a hole in their government. John Michael McGrath considers the options

On deck this week: On Monday, the Toronto Local Appeal Body will meet at the Scarborough Civic Centre. On Tuesday, the Toronto Public Library Board will meet from 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. at the Toronto Reference Library. The agenda includes increases in the 2019 Operating Budget Submission – Revised and the 2019 – 2028 Capital Budget and Plan Submission – Revised. On Wednesday, the Sign Variance Committee will meet about applications for four digital billboards – two that staff support and two they advise the committee should refuse. These include: A V-shape sign on Queensway near Kipling (Etobicoke-Lakeshore, Mark Grimes) where Outfront Media is requesting permission to build it higher than is usually permitted in order to be viewed by traffic (staff support the request); a V-shape sign on Leslie north of Eglinton (Don Valley East, Denzil Minnan-Wong), where Pattison Outdoor is requesting permission to build near an open space district (staff support the request); a new digital sign by the Argonaut Rowing Club near Lakeshore and Jameson  (Parkdale-High Park, Gord Perks) in an area where none currently exist (staff do not support the request); a new digital sign by Citylite Signs on Kennedy north of Lawrence (Scarborough Centre, Michael Thompson) in an area where signs currently exist (staff do not support the request).


 

Election, Anti-Semitism, and editorial

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This Newsbrief is by Arianne Robinson.