City manager’s office hiring three executive positions with salary ranges between $196,596 to $243,261 a year; Prefab structures for homeless respite going up starting in December, the Ex’s Queen Elizabeth Building being used for now

12:02 p.m., March 2, 2018. On Yonge, north of Sheppard, someone seeks shelter in a sleeping bag on a cot, under the construction hoarding.
12:02 p.m., March 2, 2018. On Yonge, north of Sheppard, someone seeks shelter in a sleeping bag on a cot, under the construction hoarding.

Weekend Newsbrief: November 11, 2018

What happened at Toronto City Hall this week

 

City manager’s office hiring three executive positions with salary ranges between $196,596 to $243,261 a year. Applications for a chief of staff, an executive director of transit expansion, and an executive director of the city’s people, equity and human rights are being accepted by city human resources and third party headhunters this month. The transit position is part of a new transit expansion office that the Toronto Star’s Ben Spurr reported this week will cost $2 million for 12 to 15 employees and $196,596 to $221,166 for the salary range of the executive director (called a “transit czar” by Tory at the announcement). Mayor John Tory justified the need for the new bureaucratic office with the mandate he received from the Torontonians who voted for him. “The voters specifically and emphatically reaffirmed support for that plan when they re-elected me last month,” Tory said, emphasizing he campaigned on the relief line, the Scarborough subway, the Eglinton LRT (east and west), SmartTrack, and the waterfront transit network.” The 35-hour-a-week executive director of people, equity and human rights position has the highest salary range from $216,252.40 to $243,261.40 a year. The permanent chief of staff position posted earlier this month is for the day-to-day management of the city manager’s office under the new city manager Chris Murray,  and is also 35 hours a week with a salary/rate of $196,596 to $221,166 a year.

Exhibition Place Queen Elizabeth Building will be used as a temporary homeless shelter, prefabricated structures going up starting in December. Paul Raftis, General Manager of Shelter, Support and Housing Administration held a press conference at city hall this week to announce the city’s plan for its homeless population. The temporary 24-hour respite program at the Ex will open starting this Thursday. Prefabricated structures will be located at King St. and Dufferin (Lamport Stadium) planned to open December 15, Strachan and Lake Shore Blvd. West (at 701 Fleet St.) planned to open January 31, and at Lake Shore Blvd. East and Cherry St. (across from the Sidewalk Labs office) planned to open January 31. The structures have HVAC systems, showers, washrooms, and laundry facilities and can be repurposed in the future. Raftis said Metro Hall warming centre will be open during any cold weather alert and the city will add additional staff to the 24/7 street outreach teams. “In terms of our system performance from last year, there’s no question that there were operational and communication challenges in the shelter system. With guidance from the ombudsman [Susan Opler], we’ve worked hard to address these issues … We have invested in our central intake referral service with additional staff on hand to answer calls. Better technology to manage those calls, and a new working space to help boost call centre productivity,” Raftis said.


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In other news…
On deck next week.
Good to know public consultation information
Twitter poll results on Tsar vs Czar

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This Newsbrief is by Arianne Robinson